Today, December 7, 2023, Mecklenburg County Community Support Services  released the 2023 State of Housing Instability & Homelessness (SoHIH) Report. The annual SoHIH report synthesizes local, regional, and national data on the full housing continuum. It provides a knowledge base that Charlotte-Mecklenburg uses to make informed policy, practice, and funding decisions to facilitate optimized resource allocation and systems of care.

This blog post outlines the key findings from the 2023 SoHIH and what it could mean for Charlotte-Mecklenburg.

The 2024 Charlotte-Mecklenburg Point-in-Time (PIT) Count will take place on Thursday, January 25, 2024. This annual event is when the community comes together to survey and count each person experiencing sheltered or unsheltered homelessness on one night in January. On January 25th, volunteers and outreach teams will canvass the community to locate and engage individuals experiencing unsheltered homelessness. Last year, in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, 1,916 people were counted, including 171 families, 106 unaccompanied youth (18-24), and 288 people sleeping outside. Preparations and planning are underway for the 2024 Point-in-Time (PIT) Count and we need your help. Full community support and engagement is needed to not only make this year’s PIT a success but to also move forward the work to prevent and end homelessness in Mecklenburg County.

This blog post provides information on how individuals and agencies can get involved and support this year’s PIT Count.

This blog is the first of a monthly blog series that will feature a curated list of recent news and research related to housing instability, homelessness, and affordable housing. Together, these topics provide insights on the full housing continuum and are intended to keep community stakeholders informed about emergent research, promising practices, and innovative solutions related to housing instability and homelessness.
This month’s Research and News Roundup features an innovative approach to using utility payments to predict first-time homelessness; opportunities and resources to increase affordable housing by converting commercial properties; and proposed expansion of the Healthy Opportunities Pilot, a first of its kind program that provides non-medical interventions that address housing instability and other social determinants of health (SDOH) to Medicaid participants.

As of November 1, 2023, there were 268 Veterans experiencing homelessness in Mecklenburg County. Forty-six of these Vets are chronically homeless, which means they have a disability and have been homeless one year or longer or four times in the past three years. Interagency collaboration between organizations like the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Mecklenburg County, and non-profit organizations is essential to preventing and ending Veteran homelessness.

This blog describes Veteran homelessness and highlights the services of some of the many organizations working to address Veteran homelessness in Charlotte-Mecklenburg.

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act mandates that Continuums of Care (CoCs) evaluate their collective work in resolving homelessness. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has established seven System Performance Measures to serve this purpose. On an annual basis, Charlotte-Mecklenburg is required to report its performance on six of these measures to HUD. System Performance Measures play a pivotal role in securing CoC funding and act as valuable tools for local oversight and system enhancement. This blog is the fourth installment in a series exploring Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s performance on these measures and their implications for the local community.

In this blog post, we offer an overview and present data on System Performance Measure Four: Employment and Income Growth for Homeless Persons in CoC Program-funded Projects.

The voices of people with lived expertise of homelessness are crucial to all planning and decision-making activities related to the Continuum of Care. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Continuum of Care (CoC) Lived Experience Committee (LEC) is a collaborative of individuals who work together to provide a platform for individuals who have experienced homelessness to share their insights, perspectives, and recommendations on issues related to homelessness and the services, policies, and strategies designed to address it.

This blog post will provide an introduction to Lived Experience Committees and highlight the work of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Continuum of Care Lived Experience Committee.

From July 2023 – September 2023, 1637, people (including children) had a Coordinated Entry Housing Needs assessment via a local Coordinated Entry System access point. Coordinated Entry Systems (CESs) are designed to streamline access to services and housing resources, reduce homelessness, and ensure that resources are allocated fairly based on need. The local CES is a collaborative effort between local government agencies, non-profit organizations, and community partners dedicated to addressing homelessness in a coordinated and efficient manner.

This blog provides an overview of Coordinated Entry, what it is and is not, and how persons in need can access the local coordinated entry system.

Recently, United Way of Greater Charlotte (United Way) released the A Home For All Implementation Plan. Building on the priorities identified in the Strategic Framework, the Implementation Plan outlines which priorities to advance first in order to address housing instability and homelessness across the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area. This is the first post in a series of blogs that will examine the three pillars of the A Home For All Implementation Plan: People, Prevention, and Production.

This blog provides an overview of the People Pillar.

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act requires Continuums of Care (CoCs) to assess their collective efforts to address homelessness. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has created seven System Performance Measures for this purpose. Annually, Charlotte-Mecklenburg is required to report its performance on six of these measures to HUD. These measures are important for securing CoC funding and serve as tools for local monitoring and system improvement. This is the third post in a series of blogs that examines Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s performance on these measures and the implications for the local community.

This blog provides an overview of and presents data on System Performance Measure Three: Number of Homeless Persons.