Entries by Courtney Morton

#Your Voice Counts – How to use it after Everybody Counts Charlotte: 2019 Point-in-Time Count

The Everybody Counts Charlotte: 2019 Point-in-Time Count was conducted between January 22 and February 1.  Volunteers and staff have completed surveys with individuals and families experiencing homelessness in emergency shelters, transitional housing and outside in unsheltered locations. Last year, 1,668 people were counted during the Point-in-Time Count. We share with individuals and families experiencing homelessness that completing the Point-in-Time Count survey is one way to help make their voices count: we will use the information gleaned from the survey to make changes in the community. Individuals and families are not required to complete the survey, but many of them do…each sharing their personal experiences with complete strangers in order to help others.  To be counted.  To be heard.

2019 POINT-IN-TIME COUNT: WHAT’S NEXT AND HOW TO GET INVOLVED

The 2019 Point-in-Time Count will take place on Wednesday, January 30, 2019. The Point-in-Time Count is when our community comes together to count the number of people who are experiencing homelessness on the streets and in temporary shelters throughout Mecklenburg County. The Point-in-Time Count is critical to understand the need for housing and to inform local funding and policy decision-making in the community. It also provides an opportunity to engage others around the issue of housing and homelessness and reminds us that there are people behind the numbers that we count. To learn more about how to get involved, read this post and visit the EverybodyCountsCharlotte: Point-in-Time Count website: www.everybodycountsclt.org

2019 Point-in-Time Count Work Begins

The 2019 Point-in-Time Count will take place on Wednesday, January 30, 2019. The Point-in-Time Count is when our community comes together to count the number of people who are experiencing homelessness on the streets and in temporary shelters throughout Mecklenburg County. The Point-in-Time Count is a required activity and is connected to the federal funding that Charlotte-Mecklenburg receives for the Continuum of Care (CoC). However, our community goes above and beyond to use the Point-in-Time Count as a way to both raise awareness about housing and homelessness and to collect data that can inform local decision-making. Learn about how you can get involved by reading this post.

Connecting the Dots from the Report Part 2: Seeing New Solutions

Mecklenburg County recently released the newest report from the Housing Instability and Homelessness Report Series by the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute: 2018 Charlotte-Mecklenburg State of Housing Instability and Homelessness. This is the first annual report on housing instability and homelessness data in the community and is the first time Point-in-Time Count information is combined with data from other homeless system measures and housing instability metrics to provide a full picture of housing needs in our community. In addition to the report, Mecklenburg County released a toolkit to help take the information from the report and translate it into action: the next steps or “So, What.” This blog post is the second in a series focused on the next steps outlined in the toolkit, looking at change at the community level.

Connecting the Dots from the Report Part 1: Link Solutions

Mecklenburg County recently released the newest report from the Housing Instability and Homelessness Report Series by the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute: 2018 Charlotte-Mecklenburg State of Housing Instability and Homelessness. The report serves as an annual report on housing instability and homelessness data in the community and is the first time Point-in-Time Count information is combined with data from other homeless system measures and housing instability metrics to provide a full picture of housing needs in our community. In addition to the report, Mecklenburg County released a toolkit to help take the information from the report and translate it into action: the next steps or “So, What.” This blog post is focused on one of the next steps outlined in the toolkit from the community level.

In 2018, Housing Remains Out of Reach for Many, Part 2.

Last week’s blog was dedicated to the release of new data in the 2018 Out of Reach report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. The blog discussed the need for more housing assistance, including from the private sector to decrease housing costs and close the gap. This week’s blog takes on the second part of the Out of Reach Report: the problem of low wages, the growth of low wage work and need to address wages in addition to housing to close the gap. 

Why the Housing Inventory Count Matters: A Point-in-Time Count Reflection

The Point-in-Time Count captures two important numbers: the number of people experiencing homelessness on one night and the number of beds or units available to temporarily and permanently house them. That second number – the number of beds and units – is called the Housing Inventory Count. It is a number that is critical to understand trends and progress in the work to end and prevent homelessness. It is also often left out of the conversation. When we look at the Point-in-Time Count numbers, we must consider the change in capacity, too.

Housing Counts, Everybody Counts: The 2018 Point-in-Time Count

The night of the 2018 Point-in-Time Count was January 31. Since January 15, volunteers have been completing surveys with people experiencing homelessness in emergency shelter and transitional housing. On Thursday morning, February 1st, volunteers go out into the streets and camps and other places unfit for human habitation in order to survey people experiencing homelessness outside. The Point-in-Time Count can be so much more than a census. It is an opportunity for us to lift up the voice of each and every person and family that is experiencing homelessness. We can do this by integrating what we learn from individual stories as well as the the data we collect to inform local decision-making around housing and homelessness. 

Behind The Numbers: The People & Parameters of the Point-in-Time Count

The night of the 2018 Point-in-Time Count occurs on January 31, 2018. This is when Charlotte-Mecklenburg counts the number of people experiencing homelessness in emergency shelter, transitional housing and on the streets. In 2017, that total was 1,476. The Point-in-Time Count helps communities like ours understand and describe the scope of homelessness on one night — the number and the characteristics. When we compare that number year over year and combine it with other performance data, we can better understand whether we are making progress in the work to end and prevent homelessness.

There are a number of changes to the 2018 Point-in-Time Count — some are changes required by the United States Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) and some are changes initiated from our community. Learn more here.